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Rohypnol: Facts, Effects, Symptoms

Short Term

❶The effects of Rohypnol addiction are severe, and users are recognizing the need for addiction rehab to live a drug-free life. Click to share on Facebook Opens in new window Click to share on Twitter Opens in new window Click to share on Tumblr Opens in new window Click to email this to a friend Opens in new window Click to print Opens in new window.

Drug Facts

Severe Effects
Short and Long-Term Effects
Rohypnol’s Short-Term Effects on the Brain

Like other benzodiazepines such as Valium, Ativan and Xanax , Rohypnol's therapeutic effects include:. However, the sedative effects of Rohypnol are approximately 7 to 10 times stronger than Valium. The action of Rohypnol appears 15 to 20 minutes after administration and last approximately four to six hours. Some residual effects can be found 12 hours or more after administration. Amnesia is an expected pharmacologic effect of benzodiazepines.

Rohypnol causes partial amnesia; individuals are unable to remember certain events that they experience while under the influence of the drug. However, this effect is particularly dangerous when Rohypnol is used illicitly to aid in sexual assault. Victims may not be able to clearly recall the assault, the assailant, or the events surrounding the assault. Rohypnol can be taken by mouth as a whole tablet, it can be crushed and snorted up the nose, or dissolved in a liquid prior to drinking.

Rohypnol may also be used with other drugs of abuse, such as alcohol or cocaine for various effects. Rohypnol can increase the intoxication of alcohol, or may be used to lower the irritability and anxiety linked with excessive cocaine use binging.

Rohypnol is not approved for medical use or manufactured in the United States and is not available legally. However, it is legally prescribed in over 60 other countrie s and is widely available in Mexico, Colombia, and Europe where it is used for the treatment of insomnia and as a pre-anesthetic. Rohypnol is often smuggled into the U. S from other countries, such as Mexico. Schedule IV drugs are considered to have a lower abuse potential but can lead to physical or psychological dependence.

If Rohypnol exposure is to be detected, urine samples need to be collected within 72 hours of consumption and subjected to sensitive analytical tests. Very often, biological samples are taken from the victim at a time when the effects of the drug have already passed and only residual amounts remain in the body fluids.

These residual amounts are difficult, if not impossible, to detect using standard screening assays available in the United States. Due to this, it is difficult to estimate the number of Rohypnol-facilitated rapes in the United States. The problem is compounded by the onset of amnesia after ingestion of the drug, which causes the victim to be uncertain about the facts surrounding the rape. This uncertainty may lead to critical delays or even reluctance to report the rape and to provide appropriate biological samples for toxicology testing.

Rohypnol is no longer available legally in the United States. Rohypnol, previously available as a white tablet that dissolved without color, taste, or smell is now formulated as an oblong caplet that is light green with a blue core.

The manufacturer instituted this change to help identify tampered drinks at clubs. When dissolved in clear liquids the blue core will turn the clear liquid to blue. However, when dissolved in darker-colored liquids, the blue dye may not be noticeable. Generic versions of Rohypnol may not contain the blue dye. While Rohypnol has become widely known for its use as a date-rape drug, it is abused more frequently for other reasons.

It is abused by high school students, college students, street gang members, rave party attendees, and heroin and cocaine abusers to produce profound intoxication, boost the high of heroin, modulate the effects of cocaine.

Teenagers and young males age 13 to 30 have been noted as the primary abusers of Rohypnol. Rohypnol is usually consumed orally, and is often combined with alcohol. Rohypnol use causes a number of adverse effects, which may last 12 hours of more, including:.

Chronic use of Rohypnol can result in physical dependence and the appearance of a withdrawal syndrome when the drug is discontinued. Behavioral Therapies Cognitive-behavioral therapy CBT Contingency management, or motivational incentives, including vouchers The Matrix Model Community-based recovery groups, such as Step programs Mobile medical application: Physical effects include hypertension, increased heart rate, agitation, seizures, dilated pupils.

Other Health-related Issues At high doses, cardiac and respiratory arrest have occurred. Behavioral Therapies More research is needed to find out if DMT is addictive and, if so, whether behavioral therapies are effective.

Other Health-related Issues Sometimes used as a date rape drug. In Combination with Alcohol Nausea, problems with breathing, greatly increased depressant effects.

Withdrawal Symptoms Insomnia, anxiety, tremors, sweating, increased heart rate and blood pressure, psychotic thoughts. Treatment Options Medications Benzodiazepines. Behavioral Therapies More research is needed to find out if behavioral therapies can be used to treat GHB addiction. Long-term Collapsed veins; abscesses swollen tissue with pus ; infection of the lining and valves in the heart; constipation and stomach cramps; liver or kidney disease; pneumonia.

In Combination with Alcohol Dangerous slowdown of heart rate and breathing, coma, death. Withdrawal Symptoms Restlessness, muscle and bone pain, insomnia, diarrhea, vomiting, cold flashes with goose bumps "cold turkey".

Long-term Liver and kidney damage; bone marrow damage; limb spasms due to nerve damage; brain damage from lack of oxygen that can cause problems with thinking, movement, vision, and hearing. Withdrawal Symptoms Nausea, tremors, irritability, problems sleeping, and mood changes.

Behavioral Therapies More research is needed to find out if behavioral therapies can be used to treat inhalant addiction. Long-term Ulcers and pain in the bladder; kidney problems; stomach pain; depression; poor memory. In Combination with Alcohol Increased risk of adverse effects. Treatment Options Medications There are no FDA-approved medications to treat addiction to ketamine or other dissociative drugs. Behavioral Therapies More research is needed to find out if behavioral therapies can be used to treat addiction to dissociative drugs.

Long-term Gastrointestinal disorders such as constipation, ulcers, and stomach inflammation; and increased risk of heart attack. Other Health-related Issues In rare cases associated with heavy use: Withdrawal Symptoms Depression, nightmares, low blood pressure, and lack of energy. Treatment Options Medications It is not known whether khat is addictive.

There are no FDA-approved medications to treat addiction to khat. Behavioral Therapies More research is needed to find out if khat is addictive and, if so, whether behavioral therapies are effective. Long-term Anorexia, weight loss, insomnia, skin darkening, dry mouth, frequent urination, constipation. Hallucinations with long-term use at high doses in some users.

Withdrawal Symptoms Muscle aches, insomnia, hostility, aggression, emotional changes, runny nose, jerky movements. Treatment Options Medications No clinical trials have been conducted on medications for kratom addiction. Behavioral Therapies More research is needed to find out if behavioral therapies can be used to treat addiction to kratom. Long-term Frightening flashbacks called Hallucinogen Persisting Perception Disorder [HPPD] ; ongoing visual disturbances, disorganized thinking, paranoia, and mood swings.

Behavioral Therapies More research is needed to find out if behavioral therapies can be used to treat addiction to hallucinogens.

Long-term Mental health problems, chronic cough, frequent respiratory infections. Other Health-related Issues Youth: In Combination with Alcohol Increased heart rate, blood pressure; further slowing of mental processing and reaction time. Withdrawal Symptoms Irritability, trouble sleeping, decreased appetite, anxiety. Long-term Long-lasting confusion, depression, problems with attention, memory, and sleep; increased anxiety, impulsiveness; less interest in sex. Alcohol can increase plasma concentrations of MDMA, which may increase the risk of neurotoxic effects.

Withdrawal Symptoms Fatigue, loss of appetite, depression, trouble concentrating. Treatment Options Medications There are no FDA-approved medications to treat addiction to mescaline or other hallucinogens. In Combination with Alcohol Masks the depressant effect of alcohol, increasing risk of alcohol overdose; may increase blood pressure. Withdrawal Symptoms Depression, anxiety, tiredness. Behavioral Therapies More research is needed to find out if behavioral therapies can be used to treat addiction to dextromethorphan.

In high does, can produce euphoria. May lessen cravings and withdrawal symptoms of other drugs. Other Health-related Issues Fainting, stomach pain, constipation, loss of consciousness, cardiovascular toxicity, pupil dilation, and kidney failure from urinary retention.

Withdrawal Symptoms Severe anxiety, vomiting, and diarrhea. Behavioral Therapies The same behavioral therapies that have helped treat addiction to heroin may be used to treat addiction to loperamide.

Long-term Memory loss, problems with speech and thinking, loss of appetite, anxiety. Withdrawal Symptoms Headaches, increased appetite, sleepiness, depression. Long-term Increased risk of overdose or addiction if misused. Miscarriage, low birth weight, neonatal abstinence syndrome. In Combination with Alcohol Dangerous slowing of heart rate and breathing leading to coma or death. Withdrawal Symptoms Restlessness, muscle and bone pain, insomnia, diarrhea, vomiting, cold flashes with goose bumps "cold turkey" , leg movements.

Treatment Options Medications Methadone Buprenorphine Naltrexone short- and long-acting Behavioral Therapies The same behavioral therapies that have helped treat addiction to heroin are used to treat prescription opioid addiction.

Long-term Heart problems, psychosis, anger, paranoia. In Combination with Alcohol Masks the depressant action of alcohol, increasing risk of alcohol overdose; may increase blood pressure. Withdrawal Symptoms Depression, tiredness, sleep problems.

Behavioral Therapies Behavioral therapies that have helped treat addiction to cocaine or methamphetamine may be useful in treating prescription stimulant addiction. Long-term Risk of flashbacks and memory problems. Other Health-related Issues Risk of poisoning if a poisonous mushroom is accidentally used. In Combination with Alcohol May decrease the perceived effects of alcohol. Treatment Options Medications It is not known whether psilocybin is addictive. There are no FDA-approved medications to treat addiction to psilocybin or other hallucinogens.

Behavioral Therapies More research is needed to find out if psilocybin is addictive and whether behavioral therapies can be used to treat addiction to this or other hallucinogens. In Combination with Alcohol Severe sedation, unconsciousness, and slowed heart rate and breathing, which can lead to death. Withdrawal Symptoms Headache; muscle pain; extreme anxiety, tension, restlessness, confusion, irritability; numbness and tingling of hands or feet; hallucinations, delirium, convulsions, seizures, or shock.

Treatment Options Medications It is not known whether salvia is addictive. There are no FDA-approved medications to treat addiction to salvia or other dissociative drugs. Behavioral Therapies More research is needed to find out if salvia is addictive, but behavioral therapies can be used to treat addiction to dissociative drugs.

Acne, fluid retention especially in the hands and feet , oily skin, yellowing of the skin, infection. Long-term Kidney damage or failure; liver damage; high blood pressure, enlarged heart, or changes in cholesterol leading to increased risk of stroke or heart attack, even in young people; aggression; extreme mood swings; anger "roid rage" ; extreme irritability; delusions; impaired judgment.

Other Health-related Issues Males: In Combination with Alcohol Increased risk of violent behavior. Withdrawal Symptoms Mood swings; tiredness; restlessness; loss of appetite; insomnia; lowered sex drive; depression, sometimes leading to suicide attempts.

Treatment Options Medications Hormone therapy Behavioral Therapies More research is needed to find out if behavioral therapies can be used to treat steroid addiction. Other Health-related Issues Use of synthetic cannabinoids has led to an increase in emergency room visits in certain areas.

Withdrawal Symptoms Headaches, anxiety, depression, irritability. Behavioral Therapies More research is needed to find out if behavioral therapies can be used to treat synthetic cannabinoid addiction. Synthetic Cathinones Bath Salts.

Street Names Commercial Names Common Forms Common Ways Taken DEA Schedule Bloom, Cloud Nine, Cosmic Blast, Flakka, Ivory Wave, Lunar Wave, Scarface, Vanilla Sky, White Lightning No commercial uses for ingested "bath salts" White or brown crystalline powder sold in small plastic or foil packages labeled "not for human consumption" and sometimes sold as jewelry cleaner; tablet, capsule, liquid Swallowed, snorted, injected I Some formulations have been banned by the DEA Possible Health Effects Short-term Increased heart rate and blood pressure; euphoria; increased sociability and sex drive; paranoia, agitation, and hallucinations; violent behavior; sweating; nausea, vomiting; insomnia; irritability; dizziness; depression; panic attacks; reduced motor control; cloudy thinking.

Withdrawal Symptoms Depression, anxiety. Long-term Greatly increased risk of cancer, especially lung cancer when smoked and oral cancers when chewed; chronic bronchitis; emphysema; heart disease; leukemia; cataracts; pneumonia. Withdrawal Symptoms Irritability, attention and sleep problems, depression, increased appetite. Strong hallucinations including altered visual and auditory perceptions; increased heart rate and blood pressure; nausea; burning sensation in the stomach; tingling sensations and increased skin sensitivity.

Possible changes to the serotoninergic and immune systems, although more research is needed. It is not known whether ayahuasca is addictive. More research is needed to find out if ayahuasca is addictive and, if so, whether behavioral therapies are effective. Drowsiness, slurred speech, poor concentration, confusion, dizziness, problems with movement and memory, lowered blood pressure, slowed breathing. Sleep medications are sometimes used as date rape drugs.

Must be discussed with a health care provider; barbiturate withdrawal can cause a serious abstinence syndrome that may even include seizures. There are no FDA-approved medications to treat addiction to prescription sedatives; lowering the dose over time must be done with the help of a health care provider.

More research is needed to find out if behavioral therapies can be used to treat addiction to prescription sedatives. Narrowed blood vessels; enlarged pupils; increased body temperature, heart rate, and blood pressure; headache; abdominal pain and nausea; euphoria; increased energy, alertness; insomnia, restlessness; anxiety; erratic and violent behavior, panic attacks, paranoia, psychosis; heart rhythm problems, heart attack; stroke, seizure, coma.

Loss of sense of smell, nosebleeds, nasal damage and trouble swallowing from snorting; infection and death of bowel tissue from decreased blood flow; poor nutrition and weight loss; lung damage from smoking. Depression, tiredness, increased appetite, insomnia, vivid unpleasant dreams, slowed thinking and movement, restlessness. Cognitive-behavioral therapy CBT Contingency management, or motivational incentives, including vouchers The Matrix Model Community-based recovery groups, such as Step programs Mobile medical application: Intense visual hallucinations, depersonalization, auditory distortions, and an altered perception of time and body image, usually peaking in about 30 minutes when drank as tea.

It is not known whether DMT is addictive. More research is needed to find out if DMT is addictive and, if so, whether behavioral therapies are effective. Euphoria, drowsiness, nausea, vomiting, confusion, memory loss, unconsciousness, slowed heart rate and breathing, lower body temperature, seizures, coma, death.

Insomnia, anxiety, tremors, sweating, increased heart rate and blood pressure, psychotic thoughts. More research is needed to find out if behavioral therapies can be used to treat GHB addiction. Euphoria; dry mouth; itching; nausea; vomiting; analgesia; slowed breathing and heart rate.

Collapsed veins; abscesses swollen tissue with pus ; infection of the lining and valves in the heart; constipation and stomach cramps; liver or kidney disease; pneumonia. Restlessness, muscle and bone pain, insomnia, diarrhea, vomiting, cold flashes with goose bumps "cold turkey". Methadone Buprenorphine Naltrexone short- and long-acting forms. Contingency management, or motivational incentives Step facilitation therapy. Paint thinners or removers, degreasers, dry-cleaning fluids, gasoline, lighter fluids, correction fluids, permanent markers, electronics cleaners and freeze sprays, glue, spray paint, hair or deodorant sprays, fabric protector sprays, aerosol computer cleaning products, vegetable oil sprays, butane lighters, propane tanks, whipped cream aerosol containers, refrigerant gases, ether, chloroform, halothane, nitrous oxide.

Liver and kidney damage; bone marrow damage; limb spasms due to nerve damage; brain damage from lack of oxygen that can cause problems with thinking, movement, vision, and hearing. More research is needed to find out if behavioral therapies can be used to treat inhalant addiction.

Problems with attention, learning, and memory; dreamlike states, hallucinations; sedation; confusion; loss of memory; raised blood pressure; unconsciousness; dangerously slowed breathing. Sometimes used as a date rape drug. There are no FDA-approved medications to treat addiction to ketamine or other dissociative drugs.

More research is needed to find out if behavioral therapies can be used to treat addiction to dissociative drugs. Euphoria, increased alertness and arousal, increased blood pressure and heart rate, depression, paranoia, headaches, loss of appetite, insomnia, fine tremors, loss of short-term memory. Gastrointestinal disorders such as constipation, ulcers, and stomach inflammation; and increased risk of heart attack. In rare cases associated with heavy use: It is not known whether khat is addictive.

More research is needed to find out if khat is addictive and, if so, whether behavioral therapies are effective. Nausea, dizziness, itching, sweating, dry mouth, constipation, increased urination, loss of appetite.

What is Rohypnol?

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Rohypnol users often describe its effects as “paralyzing.” The effects start twenty to thirty minutes after taking the drug, peak within two hours and may persist for eight or even twelve hours. A person can be so incapacitated (made unable to act) they collapse.

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The short-term effects of using Roofies far outweigh the long-term effects, but that doesn't make the drug any safer. Some short-term effects of Rohypnol include; mellow feeling, drowsiness, dizziness, the inability think both clearly and logically, slurred speech, clumsiness, lower heart rate, breathing rate, and blood pressure, amnesia, and the .

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Rohypnol has several short-term effects Rohypnol creates a relaxed, sleepy and drunk feeling that lasts for hours Other short term affects may include blackouts, with a compete loss of memory, dizziness, nausea, difficulty . GHB, or gamma hydroxybutyric acid, is a date rape drug that is also commonly called “liquid ecstasy,” “liquid X” and “goop.” It comes as either an odorless liquid or a white powder. GHB is most commonly mixed with alcohol at dance clubs and raves. What are the Short-Term Effects?

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Some of the short term effects of Rohypnol are drowsiness, relaxation, drunk feeling for 2 to 8 hours. black outs, loss of memory, dizziness, nausea, decreased motor movements and speaking capabilities are also effects of Rohypnol. Rohypnol (flunitrazepam) is used in the short-term treatment of insomnia and as a premedication for surgery. Rohypnol is also known as the date rape drug due to its amnesia properties when used illicitly. Victims given the drug would have limited or no recollection of a sexual assault.