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A Christmas Carol

by Charles Dickens

❶A crescendo builds the tension and, when Marley enters, the repetition of suspended minor chords gives the feeling of mystery and an edge to the scene.

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Should all of Charles Dickens' marvelous creations, from Mr. Pickwick to Edwin Drood, be suddenly threatened with extinction, the story of Mr. Scrooge would certainly survive Dickens wrote five Christmas books: The worlds of dreams and nightmares, madmen and children were areas of human experience which had hitherto been all too often ignored or even denied. Their recognition helped to open up a new view of the human mind in which conventional distinctions between aesthetics A Christmas Carol is a permanent fixture in Western literature and popular culture, if only because it is retold at Christmas-time annually.

As a morality tale it is a favorite of all age groups, not only because of its sincerity but due also to its emotional appeal. So far from the Christmas Ghost Story being a colourable imitation of [Dickens's] book, numerous incongruities in the Carol, involving the unhinging of the whole plot, have been tastefully A very, very brief time, and you will dismiss the recollection of it, gladly, as an unprofitable dream, from which it happened well that you awoke.

The fundamental claim Freud would make about the origin of dreams is that they are expressions by the dreamer of a wish. The wish may be Consciousness III sees not merely a set of political and public wrongs, such as a liberal New Dealer might have seen, but also the deeper ills that Kafka or the German expressionists or Dickens would have seen. It would seem that there could be no clearer or more unambiguously delineated an opposition than that which occurs in Dickens's A Christmas Carol when Scrooge's nephew comes to invite his uncle to Christmas dinner.

The opposition is one universally familiar: Charles Dickens appeared on the British scene in , approximately years after Shakespeare.

It may seem to some an exaggeration to connect him with the preeminent writer of all time, William Shakespeare, but I think not. This, however, is an I had meant to ask some solemn questions about the genre or genres of A Christmas Carol. Re-reading it has put all that out of my mind. As is always the case for me when I read anything by Dickens, the inordinate linguistic exuberance of A Christmas Carol makes all formal questions seem beside the point. I shall return to the question of genre by way of its relation to this exuberance.

First, however, what can be said about Dickens's linguistic virtuosity beyond One hundred and fifty years ago, in October , Charles Dickens began the writing of one of his most popular and best-loved books, A Christmas Carol. It was written in six weeks and finished by the end of November, being fitted in in the intervals of writing the monthly parts of Martin Chuzzlewit, a work which was causing him some financial anxiety because the public did not In a well-known essay, Sergei Eisenstein describes literature in general and Dickens in particular as cinema's predecessors because of their evocation of visual effects.

I don't remember reading the book until my adult years, yet Charles Dickens's A Christmas Carol seems always to have been with me. The Carol entered my life when I lay on the living room floor with a belly full of Christmas turkey avoiding adult conversation at my grandmother's dinner.

The chains display the life Jacob Marley had lived, being, a cold and heartless, he did not participate in anything that would not benefit him solely, good deeds were never done. Many characters like Jacob Marley exist in the 21st Century, they are generally unhappy and do not live long, productive lives. Good deeds must be done to be granted real happiness and this is also a clear message that is consistent throughout the text.

The 21st century is becoming a mirror of the 19th. The 19th century, due to rapidly expanding industrialization, saw an appalling rise in poverty, and the exploitation of poor children, who were often forced to work in the rapidly expanding factories.

Today this is happening all over the world and especially in developing countries. Charles Dickens wrote this novel at the beginning of the Hungry Forties, this being a period of intense suffering for the working classes. Dickens sought to make his comfortable middle-class readers aware of the appalling poverty around them. This can contrast to what is going on today in our society, poverty exists everywhere and it is also important to be aware and then assist in any way possible to then help those who need it.

These words come back to haunt Scrooge several times in the course of the text and the inhumanity of his question is emphasised by his increased discomfort when confronted with his words. This was because his father was imprisoned for debt in Dickens spent ten hours a day sticking labels on pots of boot blacking. His life was miserable and he was determined to improve the quality of his and those of other poor people. Crime rates increased dramatically due to poverty and destitution.

The memories of these hard times haunted dickens for the rest of his life. He felt bad about the neglect of the poor. In a lot of his work he describes the issues with poverty and the social and physical conditions of Victorian London. He compares these conditions to the wealthy, luxurious lifestyles of the upper class to bring awareness of the disgusting standards of living at the lower end of society, so that everyone could be educated on this subject, he even gave public reading of his own work.

However, this era had affected the country physically, socially, and culturally, because of the establishment of the factory system. Many people began moving to cities in search of a secure job, this lead to a huge growth in the population. This caused there to be three times more people living in Great Britain at the end of the century than the beginning. The overcrowding resulted in conditions that were dangerous and caused an increase in crime and poverty. In London the river Thames was full of sewage and the air was full of soot and pollution.

Young children and adults were forced to work 14 hours a day and were paid rock bottom wages even though they were working in life threatening conditions. The poor had no jobs, not enough food and had a low life expectancy of twenty nine. However, the higher classes made increasing profits at the expense of the poor. The rich took advantage of the poor by forcing them to work long hours in life threatening conditions for little pay. At the beginning of the novel the reader is immediately given a negative impression of scrooge being a stingy old man.

Dickens emphasises the point by describing Scrooge with many words that all mean nearly the same:

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In A Christmas Carol, an allegory of spiritual values versus material ones, Charles Dickens shows Scrooge having to learn the lesson of the spirit of Christmas, facing the reality of his own.

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A Christmas Carol, although it is of a different time period still today teaches valuable lessons. In the story, Ebeneezer Scrooge begins by having no feelings for anything or anybody. In the end, he changes from his gloomy, dark self. Charles Dickens expresses through a Christmas Carol that /5(10). Essays and criticism on Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol - A Christmas Carol, Charles Dickens.

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A Christmas Carol Essay. Charles Dickens's A Christmas Carol is a morality tale of a selfish and bitter Ebenezer Scrooge and his visits from 3 spirits representing his past, present and future, bringing him into a complete change of character and reconciliation for his wrongs. Starting an essay on Charles Dickens's A Christmas Carol? Organize your thoughts and more at our handy-dandy Shmoop Writing Lab.